Promoting the Louisiana
and National Marriage Amendments
 
         
 

 

 


© Louisiana Family Forum

             
 
 

Q: Shouldn’t homosexuals have the right to marry?
Q: Why do you put homosexual "marriage" in quotes?
Q: What does the Louisiana Marriage Amendment say?
Q: How can that judge possibly overturn the will of the people of Louisiana? What happened to "We the People!?"
Q: Isn't it mean to exclude homosexuals from marrying when heterosexuals have such high divorce rates?

Q: Shouldn’t homosexuals have the right to marry?

A: No one in society has ever had the right to marry anyone they want. No individual has ever had the right to redefine marriage for the rest of us. Everyone has equal access to marriage, and everyone is equally subject to its restrictions. In our country, each person must meet the five criteria below in order to get married:

1) You cannot already be married.
2) You must be an adult and marry an adult.
3) You cannot marry a close family member.
4) You must marry a human.
5) Your spouse must be of the opposite sex.

Everyone abides by these same rules, and anyone who meets all five criteria can enter into marriage. Same-sex marriage advocates subtly distort the law in order to justify their cause. They claim, falsely, that the right to marry lies in any couple, when in fact it lies in the individual. Not just any conceivable configuration of people has the right to marry because rights belong to individuals—not groups. Every person, however, has the right to marry provided he or she meets the five criteria enumerated in law and nature.

In reality, homosexuals have the exact same right to marry as we all do. They choose not to marry members of the opposite sex, but they could if they wanted to.

This debate is not about who has access to marriage—we all do. It’s about defending what marriage is and always has been.

Q: Why do you put homosexual "marriage" in quotes?

LFF’s publication standards in regards to language are very strict. We work diligently in the "battle of words" to maintain thorough use of diction, and we strive to protect words like “couple,” or “marriage,” so that their meanings remain pure.

For example, we do not use the word “gays,” because homosexuality is not innate, it is behavioral. Nor do we refer to to homosexual “couples,” because “couple” requires male and female. We also do not use the word marriage when referring to homosexual pairing, unless it is in quotes, i.e., homosexual “marriage” because marriage has also always required male and female.

What does the Louisiana Marriage Amendment say?

Click here to view the language.

How can that judge possibly overturn the will of the people of Louisiana? What happened to "We the People?"

To answer you question regarding the marriage amendment vote, we need to back up a little bit. American government doesn’t work on a “majority rules” principle. It operates on the balance of power principle, with four branches. Three are within structured government: the executive, legislative, and judicial; and the fourth branch is the people. These four each have powers that balance the others.

If/when there one branch perceives an imbalance, such as how this judge overruled the people and legislature of Louisiana, then a few options can begin falling into place.

First, the ruling will be appealed to a higher court (in this case, the First Circuit Court of Appeals), and likely to the highest court, the Supreme Court of Louisiana. That’s the judicial response. Second, the people can take the option to “unelect” a rogue judge through a recall election. Third, the Legislature could decide to impeach the judge for misbehavior. That’s the legislative balance. Finally, the executive could refuse to uphold the judicial decision.

When it is working properly, a judge can certainly overrule an unconstitutional action of one of the other branches of government. ...But so can the others, when a judge is wrong.

Q: Isn't it mean to exclude homosexuals from marrying when heterosexuals have such high divorce rates?

A: Marriage must be protected because it is vital to the continuation of society. If a patient is sick, that doesn't mean you shoot them! You provide a way for the patient to recover. Allowing homosexuals to marry would dilute marriage, not strengthen it. For another look at this angle, read syndicated columnist Jennifer Morse's take. Covenant Marriage is what Louisiana Family Forum believes is a real step in the right direction to ending divorce.

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